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Historiae

Violette Imperiale Pop Art Candle 190g

$44.00 USD

Olfactory pyramid                        

-Top notes  : orange, blackcurrant, peach.

-Heart notes  : violet, iris, raspberry, ylang ylang.

-Base notes  : vanilla, musk, amber, vetiver, sandalwood.

The violet is a herbaceous plant native to Europe. It grows wild and is cultivated in Asia, France and North America. Flowering takes place in March and April in France.

"The violet is often associated with women whose suave, heady beauty is imbued with mystery.

This fragrance captures the essence of a violet flower with an elegant and playful temperament.

The first notes are tasty and velvety thanks to the Orange which goes well with nuances of Cassis and Peach. A subtle note of Violette then appears, with a powdery allure and faceted by the noble Iris, while the Ylang-Ylang and the raspberry bring a tender and melting texture, evoking the lipsticks of former days.

In the background, if the woody notes of Vetiver and Sandalwood echo a refined garden, the wake is also soft and vaporous thanks to the roundness of the Musks which envelop the Amber and Vanilla in a very textile spirit, echoing the very sumptuous of the second empire. The stems and leaves of the flowers are distilled with volatile solvents to obtain the absolute. In prestige perfumery, the Absolue of violet leaf is often discolored, the dark color being little desired for the creation of perfumes.

Reed Diffuser, fair trade essential oils based, Bio Alcool with no glycol ether. 100ml perfumed bottle.

Imported from France.

Art Perfumer:    Bertrand Duchaufour

The violet experienced two great periods of glory during the 19th century, both associated with the Empress of France. First period of glory: under Napoleon 1st, because the violet was associated with Joséphine de Beauharnais who, on the day of his first meeting with Bonaparte, would have sported a bouquet of violets on his belt and would have offered it to him. The latter had got into the habit of giving her a bouquet of violets in turn on each anniversary. The violet was thereafter the rallying symbol of the partisans of the return of Napoleon who recognized themselves with the phrase "Do you like violets".